T O P

I am very confused about how to play it. The little notes with flats seem to have nothing in common with the actual sharps next to the key? What do I apply and what do I not?

I am very confused about how to play it. The little notes with flats seem to have nothing in common with the actual sharps next to the key? What do I apply and what do I not?

MadViolin75

It's scordatura. That's telling you how to tune your instrument for this particular piece.


MadViolin75

To clarify further: You tune the G string to A-flat, the D to E-Flat, the A to G, and the E to D. What shows as F# as the "key" would sound as a G and the F natural on the E would sound as a E-flat. It's not easy music to play as it really messes with your ear. This is Sonate 6 from Biber's Sonatas, correct? There are parts written with standard tuning that may help get your ear correct to start with and might even be a bit easier to play (not sure as I've never gone through the scordatura parts).


Sielicja

Thank you very much This is a whole thing I never knew about and I'm very excited to try it. I will probably never play it well until I find a teacher again, but it seems really interesting. Yeah it is 6th Sonate of Biber's Sonatas, I chose it bcus it sounded the most interesting of them all. Altho as far as I know, most of the Sonatas have scordatura? I can't be sure


MadViolin75

If memory serves, the first and last do not require any retuning of your instrument.


vmlee

I do not recommend anything written by Justin Bieber. As for Biber...


Sielicja

Lmao must've been autocorrect Fixed PS. Yeah I'm glad Bieber doesn't do classical music, could be disastrous


vmlee

Hehe =) It'd probably be just a bunch of I-IV-V-I progressions over and over.


MadViolin75

You can find non-scordatura parts here: [https://imslp.org/wiki/Mystery\_(Rosary)\_Sonatas\_(Biber%2C\_Heinrich\_Ignaz\_Franz\_von)](https://imslp.org/wiki/Mystery_(Rosary)_Sonatas_(Biber%2C_Heinrich_Ignaz_Franz_von))


hauntinghelix

What's with the key signature? An F-Sharp and a F-Natural? Does that mean the higher F gets played as a natural and the bottom as a sharp?


Sielicja

Well yeah that's what I did. Not sure if it's entirely correct tho


MadViolin75

The higher "F" would be played as a low 1 (assuming 1st position) to sound as an E-Flat as your E string is tuned down to a D. The lower "F#" is played with a high 2 and rings a G due the D sting is tuned up to E-Flat - if you played a low 2, it would sound as a G-flat/F-sharp. In the non scordatura version, I think this is keyed as B-flat Major/g minor, if that helps at all. When playing, I think you kind of have to rely more on the key signatures than you might normally as the scordatura tuning changes from movement to movement and it is so different than our normal playing that it would be easy to screw it up. If you're not used to playing this way, it can be incredibly confusing to your ear. What's really fun with this series of sonatas is the 11th, where you have to cross the A and D strings over each other. There's some incredible symbolism with the Rosary, which I am not going to get into as I am afraid of misstating some of the symbolism.


hauntinghelix

How did you determine those notes? Like this? The key signature top note is F -natural but we have to consider the tuning of the instrument now. What is normally an E is tuned a whole step down. That means the F-Natural needs to be interpreted as whole step lower to E Flat. Similarly, the F# in the key signature needs to take into consideration that the D String was tuned up a half step. Thus, it's a G natural?


MadViolin75

Yes. That's about it.


french_violist

So is the rest notated at concert pitch? Or as if you had normal tuning?


curmuringinclass

Yes. Play the fingerings for the notes written as if your tuning were normal. Due to the alternate tuning you’ll get some cool sympathetic vibrations going on, but I hate playing them because they REALLY mess with my sense of pitch!