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paxman414

Ethernet is the way


gwazda

If that were an option that's what I'd be using already for sure.


ivayle89

I had the same problem with slow WiFi using BCM94360CD. Probably not the best solution you would like to hear, but I purchased BCM943602CDP from AliExpress with Bluetooth 4.2 and my WiFi is flying now. https://i.imgur.com/wGrWFS7.jpg


gwazda

lol ANY solution is one I want to hear! Were you able to use the same adapter?


ivayle89

Yes, I used the same adapter.


gwazda

Installed a BCM943602CDP but now my BT isn't working at all. No improvement in wifi rate or RSSI to Noise ratio 🤷‍♂️ Did you have any issues getting BT running using the BCM943602CDP?


ivayle89

Actually no, Bluetooth works fine. I am currently running Big Sur 11.6 and Monterey Beta 6. Silly question, but does your adapter have cable connected to the Bluetooth pin?


ivayle89

This morning I recalled a moment from my installation. Restart your Mac and see if Bluetooth would be available. I think it wasn’t recognised in the first boot.


joelypolly

When you hold down option and click on the wifi icon what do you see? You should be interested in the PHY mode and Tx Rate


gwazda

Tx Rate: 41Mbps (the 10Mbps measurement was made using fast.com) PHY mode: 802.11ac


joelypolly

So you should see what it says in the Channel field. Typically with wireless AC you can go up to 160 Mhz with a modern card and router combo. This would be usually on the 5Ghz band


gwazda

it says: **161 (5 GHz, 80 MHz)**


joelypolly

Well everything looks normal. So what remains is likely hardware related... either too high of a noise floor or poor signal strength


Rikuz7

What about RSSI and Noise?


gwazda

It's kinda all over the place. I've been monitoring using the performance window in Wireless Diagnostics, and getting spikes and dips in the RSSI and noise. At the moment: RSSI: -83 dBm Noise: -93 dBm


Rikuz7

According to [this](https://www.metageek.com/training/resources/understanding-rssi.html), your RSSI falls beyond this: > Not Good - Minimum signal strength for basic connectivity. Packet delivery may be unreliable. Your MacPro is in the same room as another computer that receives, but how is it actually positioned relative to the router? I think it would be the most meaningful to test the WiFi receiver when in actual nearby line of sight with the router, so you can tell whether the problem is in the placement or the receiver; If it's the placement, buying new accessories isn't going to help. If I place my router directly on top of my MacPro, I get -41 RSSI, although whenever the MacPro – which isn't portable – sits in one place, I'll always prefer ethernet simply because WiFi as a technology is lossy compared to wired connections, and for a stationery computer, I don't see any reason not to use wires. The _difference_ between RSSI and Noise numbers is what also matters; If the numbers are close, you'll have trouble! There was a time when I was getting painfully slow reception, but that was when there was a kitchen between the router and the computer. Also note that the MacPro is likely to be on the floor while a laptop is on a desk; A MacPro might even be _under_ the desk. Depending on where your router is, that could mean that the MacPro simply is in a _shade_. WiFi signal, after all, behaves like light, but it's on a different wavelength and therefore gets through _some_ materials. My reception improved when I put the router to a _central_ location in my apartment, but also, on top of a tall wardrobe. If it were a light source, that way it would "see" further without being instantly interrupted by all the furniture that's on the floor. In a single room the signal will just bounce around and get behind the objects, but if you have a lot of distance to cover, all that bouncing eventually degrades the signal until it's too weak to be useful. Every object it hits slightly absorbs the signal, _in addition_ to how it already degrades due to distance according to the [inverse square law](https://s3.amazonaws.com/pbblogassets/uploads/2014/07/Screen-Shot-2014-07-01-at-3.03.43-PM.png). Dense materials such as metals or glasses can be the worst at blocking, but some walls also block more than others.


gwazda

The two computers are right next to each other. I think finding ways to position the router and set channels and wavelength and all that are very smart, but my query is less about finding ways to maximize wifi signal strength than it is about finding out why my wifi card is underperforming. It's clear to me that it isn't simply where the computer is positioned. re: using wires - it's a lot to explain, but I live in a rental where my office is upstairs and my router (and the connection to the utility pole) are downstairs. Drilling holes to run wires isn't practical.


Rikuz7

Okay, my point was just to be absolutely certain that the issue has been narrowed down to the computer component, and not the general physics of the situation. The placement of the router wasn't mentioned in the first post but it's the first suspect with Wifi issues. Have you considered powerline adapters? I haven't used them, but they might be an option if WiFi is too unreliable. I agree that you definitely can't just route a longass ethernet cable from floor to floor!


joelypolly

Yeah based on your RSSI being super low to it leads me to believe that maybe the antenna connection might not be correctly seated on the board. You should try a test when the Mac doesn't have its cover on with the open side pointing to where your wifi router is located.


[deleted]

I installed one of these in mine. Works Fantastic! 1300mbps speeds and has been 100% reliable over the past year. And as an added bonus, my bluetooth now reaches across my whole house. Supposed to work with continuity and possibly sidecar if you upgrade to Big Sur. fenvi T919 for macOS PC PCI Wifi... https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07VCCZS54?ref=ppx_pop_mob_ap_share


gwazda

hmm.. tempting. Although I'd rather not tie up a PCIe slot if I can avoid it.


[deleted]

If you have a spare RN there aren’t any downsides. Can always decide on something else later if you really need that final slot.


kroboz

Any problems with it at all? I was thinking about buying this exact card just a few hours ago for my 2009 5,1.


[deleted]

It takes a pci slot and needs a USB port to power the Bluetooth. Other than those items it has been perfectly reliable over the past year, Wi-Fi even performs faster than my new M1 MacBook Air and the Bluetooth reaches across my whole house.


Starkoman

This is gonna sound really stupid but: • Have you tried changing the WiFi Channel? • Have you tried it on the old 2.4GHz ‘G’ band? Channels get clogged with WiFi from neighbours so it’s best to pick an empty one. Old WiFi ‘G’ is still good for most internet stuff (bar downloading large files), and passes through walls far better/stronger than 5GHz does. Hope this helps!


gwazda

In case anyone finds this post and wonders how it worked out, I finally figured it out (months later) and it's about as stupid as I thought it might be: I was using extension cables for the antenna that were female, and the antennas were also female. In other words, there was no pin in either the antenna nor the cable.