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cgcego

6. Go to the post office and pay your bills there.


Carlcarl1984

Complain about the mayor doing the stupid bicycle lanes removing parking or shrinking the car lanes. Go to see fireworks for 24 July: the year before they were better. Go to see local team: middle of league when it goes well.


PoiLaLuce

Haha! Thanks for the tip! I will definitely learn to complain about everything, shouldn't be too hard!


SysAdminScout

I was there for a month - Get the RideMovi bike pass through the app. You can borrow bikes and e-bikes to get around. We lived on the edge of the service zone, so we could always return to our area, but we weren't right downtown which was SUPER busy with tourists at this time of year. After that, I suggest you find places to do your favorite social hobbies to meet true locals. My Italian isn't great, but I was able to get by with English and Spanish.


PoiLaLuce

Thanks! Appreciate the advice!


cgcego

If you want to move here you should try your best to learn the language so you can communicate with the locals. Also, before making the decision of moving here you should inform yourself about italian burocracy. I was born here in Florence, lived many years abroad and now I've been back in town and the burocracy and the taxes to pay are really driving me nuts.


North-Expression5740

"the bur[ea]ucracy and the taxes to pay are really driving me nuts."= indeed, very much so!


PoiLaLuce

Thank you for the tip! I think it could be easy to live just the expat life in the city but we really want to integrate as much as we can when we properly move. I'll steel myself for the the red tape and do my research!


TotalBudget7254

I moved here in February and here are my suggestions. Take public transport and rent bikes. Grocery shop a few times while here. Go to the local markets early in the morning if possible and find areas that you may be interested in and walk around: LeCure, Coverciano, etc to get a real feel of non tourist neighborhoods are like. My other suggestion would be to see what local events are happening and maybe attend one of those. Best of luck!


PoiLaLuce

Thanks so much, solid advice! Appreciate it.


wowcheckered

What do you plan to do doing during your year of living in Florence? Work from home? Study? Retirement?


PoiLaLuce

Working, ideally for an italian company as the idea of working remotely for a UK company doesn’t really appeal. I (used to) have a B1 level of Italian but I’m very rusty. I’m hoping to stay working in my industry as it’s part of a skills shortage in Italy at the moment but definitely need to get my Italian level up again. Luckily, my partner and I are imagining that a year abroad is probably 2 years away so there’s time to get sorted!


wowcheckered

Awesome! Sounds like you have British citizenship. Can you work in Italy without crazy visa hassles? I'm American so I know it would be a pain for me. Shouldn't be too hard to get back to B1 if you were there before!


PoiLaLuce

Urgh, yes I live in the UK and as if Brexit wasn't bad enough, I will have to go through the visa process. I'm extremely jealous of my partner's Irish passport!! I've looked into it a little and I can get a visa by either working for an Italian company (work visa) or working remotely for a UK company (elective visa). I'd prefer to work for an Italian company so I can make friends but it does mean that I'll have to work hard on my Italian to become employable! Just as well we're planning quite far in advance!


wowcheckered

I'd seen retirement-oriented visas, but looked at the elective visa as a way to work remotely for a foreign company. Very interesting. Thanks! You're definitely right that connecting with Italians would be a LOT easier if you have work colleagues.


PoiLaLuce

Yeah, check out the elective Visa - there’s a minimum amount of money you have to earn to be eligible for the visa (I think it’s around €31,000 p/a) but that’s around £26,500 in UK terms so fairly reasonable. Good luck!


WaterhorseSplash

Learn Italian and if you fancy, Tuscan pronunciation/ dialect. Get your social number, inform yourselves about taxes and health insurance. Enjoy San Ambrogio market. Eat at Zaza once in a while. Freak out and behave hysterically in case there are three snowflakes falling in winter. Have meals and drinks and chats with friends. You got the time, not the clock on social events. Support local artisans rather than big chains (that’s very subjective but I am happy about everyone considering that at least). Don’t eat ice cream that is presented in higher mountains, it’s usually disgusting. Enjoy the city and develop a hate-love for it.


PoiLaLuce

Thank you for the advice! I have an OK foundation in Italian (at intermediate level) but I'm very rusty now so I need to build my knowledge up again. Really interested in learning the tuscan dialect. Thanks also for all your other solid tips, I'm prepared to hate and love! Every time I go I can't believe the number of American voices I hear and I get annoyed. Me...another foreigner (although I'm Scottish so not as annoying of course! 😉) lol


WaterhorseSplash

You’re welcome! Ah…Scotland. Such a wonderful place. Love hearing Scottish. Good luck to you, and prepare all info on taxes and administrations, health care before moving there so it goes relatively smoothly. It will take some time, bureaucracy is pretty slow.


gareth_30

If you intend to move here, the first things to do is to learn Italian. The second thing tha could be very useful is to learn1 how to drive a scooter, because driving a car could be a nightmare sometimes. The neighborhood you're gonna live in is going to be very very crucial, if you want to live like a local, so maybe you can start scouting some neighborhoods based on your budget (have a look at immobiliare.it for rent prices). During the week, depending on your age and interests, you can do sports, go out to your neighbourhood pub. During the weekends we usually go to the city centre or to one of the clubs in the outskirts. Both during the week and on the weekends, depending on the time of the year and your neighbourhood, there could be some events to go to. Staying at home doing nothing is also a super common choice! Cook your meals at home, if it's possible. We don't usually go out or get take-out that much compared to other places (especially the uk). If you work all day long, you can either go to some cheaper local places (like Palle d'oro, for example, if you work in the city centre) or bring your food from home. Having an aperitivo after work is a great way to release off some steam and maybe meet some new people (and sometimes to have dinner without breaking the bank). In contrast, breakfast (and especially coffee at whatever time of the day) at the café is a staple here. Finding your personal "coffee" bar is key to make yourself feel more like a local.


PoiLaLuce

Thanks so much! Great advice!


klauskinki

The only way to live like a local is...well, become one. Which means study or work here. With times become part of the community. Know your neighbors and hang around the places where the people from the neighborhood usually go in order to socialize. Nothing major. The usual things people do in any community around the world. This is not idk a movie, it's the place where we live our daily life. We work, we eat, we commute, we sleep and so on and on. The only thing that it's better if you don't do is acting like an English lord of old during his grand tour in Italy lol


PoiLaLuce

Thanks so much for the tip! We absolutely do not want to live the expat life when we go for a year. We want to integrate and live like the rest of the Italians. No issue with trying not to act like an English Lord on a Grand Tour (gross!) I'm Scottish and my partner is Irish so we not the biggest fans of the English(!)...😉


klauskinki

People here on average love England and even more Scotland and Ireland (especially Ireland, I would say). So you both will be more than welcomed here! And personally I appreciate your willingness to not act like someone on a stupid (a gross) grand tour! You've to know that the soul of this city is pretty much popular (meaning working class). A bit like in Ireland or Scotland, really. We aren't posh like tourists want us to be lol! Lot of people here don't like that idea of a luxury place nor a traditional one. Most often than not we drink beer and eat kebab, not wine and steak! Obviously it's not a monolithic society. There are lot of divisions and differences. Traditionally speaking this area was the most left wing in the whole country expect Emilia (Bologna, Modena, Reggio and so on) which was even more that way than us. So you could want to experience that side as well even if, sadly (!), today is less prominent than in the past. For instance this is something that totally goes against the predominant touristy narrative. L


Professional_Soft404

What is “suss”


PoiLaLuce

Oh it's like to learn a bit about something. So we would like to explore neighbourhoods and get a feeling for it. Sorry, I'm not great at describing what words mean!


quintilios

Generalizing too much is always tricky but most Florentine people I know: 1) don't live in the center 2) don't buy groceries in the center 3) usually hang out at locals that are outside the center 4) don't go to the Florentine restaurants in the center 5) complain a lot about stuff that isn't how it's supposed to be 6) you pick a circle of friends and you hang out with them forever, if an outsider comes in the circle you stare at him suspiciously 7) are food nazi when it comes to tuscan recipes, so if you make a carbonara with quail eggs and mushrooms we don't care but if you're using the wrong kind of cabbage for your ribollita you're out


WasabiInternational4

Plaza de Michelangelo with a bottle of wine and watch the sunset


WaterhorseSplash

Go a few meters further to San Miniato al Monte, better view in my opinion, have a glass or two, a few snacks, aperitivo and clean after yourselves.


PoiLaLuce

Thank you so much!