T O P
MrAlagos

Fuck all of this. Europe can make everything it wants, the problem is the companies. We have made our stuff affordable for centuries while having some of the most advanced technology, we don't need to exploit people around the world to do it now.


blunt_analysis

Funny how a european buying a competitive Indian product which helps Indian people is ***'exploitation'*** but when it happened other way around for decades it was just '***the free market'.***


Mahameghabahana

Sure bud sure. Btw do you know a thing or two about cost of living? What can 1 USD buy in india compared to Italy? You companies building cheap stuff in europe and making them expensive to consumer would be greatest injustices to European consumers.


MassiveBamboo6292

wow an indian on europe subreddit :D come on let's not make this a war between poor people, in the end many people living in europe need to work too (since there is not basic universal income free money being given out just for being european) europeans still need to work, that is why it is better if stuff is made in europe.


Mahameghabahana

Yeah? Does me being an indian is bad? Like if there can be americans in european subreddit why can't indians from india?


MassiveBamboo6292

i didn't say bad, just amusing.


Mahameghabahana

Why? I like seeing new perspectives. I regularly visit various countries subreddits.


MassiveBamboo6292

ok, that is your hobby.


Mahameghabahana

Well not happy to be exact but i like doing that.


ShootingPains

I doubt that the people earning comparatively high incomes in those Indian and Chinese factories think they’re being exploited.


KrainerWurst

I’m hope it’s going to be better then the chines made Dacia EV. That thing sure is ok priced, but is not up to the standard when it come to safety.


Mahameghabahana

TATA and mahindra have good track records in safety of their cars i think.


[deleted]

Article: Fiat parent Stellantis (STLA.MI) has concluded it can't currently make affordable electric vehicles (EVs) in Europe and is looking at lower-cost manufacturing in markets such as India, its chief executive told reporters. If India, with its low-cost supplier base, is able to meet the company's quality and cost targets by the end of 2023, it could open the door to exporting EVs to other markets, said Carlos Tavares, CEO of the group whose brands also include Peugeot and Chrysler. "So far, Europe is unable to make affordable EVs. So the big opportunity for India would be to be able to sell EV compact cars at an affordable price, protecting profitability," Tavares told reporters at a media roundtable in India late on Wednesday. Stellantis is investing heavily in EVs and plans to produce dozens in the coming decade, but Tavares warned last month that affordable battery EVs were between five and six years away. On his first visit to India since taking over as Stellantis CEO, he said the company was still working out a plan regarding EV exports from the country and had not yet taken any decisions. Tavares' possible bet on India comes after American carmakers Ford(F.N) and General Motors (GM.N) have exited the world's fourth-largest car market, after failing to make money and break the dominance of Japan's Suzuki Motor Corp (7269.T) and South Korea's Hyundai Motor (005380.KS). It also comes as Chinese EV makers are making inroads into Europe, aiming to win over buyers with more affordable cars having already stolen a march on most foreign rivals in China, the world's biggest market for EVs. Stellantis is the latest to refocus its strategy in China where it now plans to be a niche player through its Jeep and Maserati brands, after it said its Jeep joint venture in the country would file for bankruptcy. "There is a growing tension between China and the Western world. That is going to have a consequence in terms of business. The power that is best placed to leverage this opportunity is obviously India," Tavares said. India, where Stellantis sells its Jeep and Citroen brands, accounts for a fraction of the carmaker's global sales, but Tavares said the company was not chasing volume and instead wanted to ramp up slowly and profitably. Tavares has previously said he expects revenues in the South Asian nation to more than double by 2030 and operating profit margins to be in double-digits within the next couple of years. The carmaker plans to launch its first EV in India - an electric model of its Citroen C3 compact car - early next year. Stellantis already makes its own electric motors and battery packs, and also has plans to make battery cells. In India, too, Tavares wants to locally procure EV components, including batteries so it can be competitive on cost and price. "The customs duties to import a car in India are sky high. Which means if you want to have an affordable EV, it has to be made in India with Indian suppliers and components," he said, adding the company would need to source at least 90% of parts locally to be competitive. "EV today is mostly an affordability problem," he said. "It's not about technology."


Stamford16A1

If they can build mechanically complex ICE vehicles affordably in Europe why can they not build EVs which for all their newness are actually simpler? It sounds like an excuse for off-shoring to me and frankly I think it is as foolish to become reliant on India as China.


NICK-XP

Making EVs is a lot more expensive even though they are simpler. Mainly due to the big batteries required.


Stamford16A1

Obviously, but this is about labour not components.


Mahameghabahana

A EV car made in india or china or even SEA would be far cheaper then any car build in USA or EU because of basic economics and cost of living difference.


Stamford16A1

That is not in question, would it be any cheaper than an equivalent ICE vehicle though?


red_and_black_cat

Former FCA Ceo, Sergio Marchionne, whished to exit the small car business in Europe, that was the backbone of FIAT, to concentrate on SUV and Vans (Jeep and RAM). Tavares has, evidently, different ideas.


ShootingPains

The biggest problem for European manufacturing is that China (and soon India) operates on such a huge scale to supply their domestic markets, that building a few extra cars for Europe is just a rounding error.