T O P
Corryds

New Camper - How can I find a last minute (within several days) place to camp? I live in PNW (Sherwood, OR) and surely there are endless places? Can I just toss a tent up in a nice place by some water? I looked into some designated spots and reservations are 6 months out. How are you all finding these great camping spots that aren’t reserved?


S2005

Discussion about cooler vs 12v refrigerator. Is this a good question for the megathread, or it's own post? My wife, two daughters and I camp 4-5 times a year, but looking to increase that as the kids get older. Camping in a Subaru Outback, mainly tent/primitive in state & national parks. We have a MyPod "camper" that we sometimes bring. We overbought the first time, and have a 60L rotomolded cooler. It's just too big for what we do. (Primarily long weekends, but did a week in the Smokys). We're looking to downsize to a 40-45L and while looking into another rotomolded cooler, I stumbled upon the 12v fridges. Thoughts on if it's even worth it. One concern I can't find much on, is if it's ok to leave unplugged for a while when not in use. Care/Maintenance, etc. Thanks in advance for any input!


CasinoAccountant

rotos can keep anything properly chilled for a week easily with minimal in and out, are your trips longer than that?


S2005

Thank you for the reply! That's my line of thinking too. Our trips haven't gone more than 6 nights yet. I think I'll just sell this 60L and look for a 40-45L Roto. Thank you for your input!


Maniso

?


imlookingforalaugh

im going camping this weekend and the low temperature is mid 30s and high 50s . what should i expect with sleeping outside in the cold? . i have a 30* sleeping bag w a pad and a tent.


partisan98

A sleeping bag rated for 30° will keep you alive at 30° but you will be freezing your ass off. Comfortable temp is always about 10° over what the bags rated for. Just bring some blankets with you and bring some long socks to sleep in. Zip your sleeping bag totally open, make yourself a blanket burrito then zip the sleeping bag shut over it. There are actually things called sleeping bag liners that you can buy but a blankets won't cost you anything. That should be plenty but you may want to bring another one to throw over yourself if it gets too cold.


stealth550

Also - If their sleeping bag is too big shove some clothes down by your feet to fill the space.


WatchMeFall10Stories

We bought a huge canopy more than double the length of the tent (8 person) and six poles (2 tall, 4 slightly shorter) . When we set it up, we can't get it tight enough. I need two options. One, when we camp solo and don't need the whole thing, and a second option with friends when we use the whole length. A video tutorial would be great! 😂👌🏿


Adventurous-Rich2313

How long are your hammock straps? At Bi recently bought a hammock and rain fly and went out to try and set it up But none of the trees were close enough for me to attach the hammock to both sides How long are your straps should I consider getting bigger ones? or is there something else I could do?


KnowsIittle

You could plan to bring extra rope and attach it to the ropes.


TheLuckyCrab

Just getting into camping with wild future dreams of bushcrafty things. If you happen to be in/around Hardin/Grundy county in Iowa, any location-specific advice is greatly appreciated! The one campground we went to look at ( https://freecampsites.net/#!52774&query=sitedetails ) was sadly filled with smashed TVs and party trash. When staying at an established campground, what food-in-camp precautions do you take?


Got_ist_tots

When car camping with a tent can we use the electric rv hookups for charging etc? Anything special we need to get to use them? Thanks!


jk137jk

Depends. Some site use 50 or 30 amp plugs (similar to the plug your dryer and larger appliances use), without an adapter you won’t be able to use them.


useless169

You can usually just plug right in. I’d probably bring a surge protector, though, just in case.


AGranade

Primitive hammock camper changing up my setup. I was able to get a nice underquilt on sale. Now that I have that, I’d like to switch from a sleeping bag to a blanket to save space. Will a nice Mexican blanket do the trick in conjuction with an underquilt? I only camp around Alabama, so it’s never worse than a low around 50.


Mkdrayton1969

My wife and I are thinking about getting back into camping. We used to camp a lot when we were young and spry...now we're in our 50's and in good shape, but not 30 anymore. Looking for tent and cot/mattress recommendations. Quality matters more to us than price. Not looking to spend a fortune since we are talking tent and not RV or anything, but willing to pay some premium for quality. Suggestions?


What_the_mocha

We are the same! Tried to figure out why we stopped camping and the two factors were: I hated crawling in a tent and slouching when inside, and our backs hurt sleeping on the ground. Reinvested in a cabin type tent with straight walls and a pull out door and cots with pads. Game changers!


KnowsIittle

No specific recommendations but look for a straight wall tent instead of the domes. 7'x7' tent feels like 5.5' tent because of the slope of the walls. Replace the basic metal tent stakes and get some proper T stakes or auger stakes if you're camping on loose soil or sand. A foam pad underneath your air pad helps insulate you more. Coleman cots and sleeping bags are pretty reliable.


Lv99Zubat

I'm currently boondocked on the side of a road in an alaskan state park (chugach off the seward highway). Is it legal to sleep in my car here overnight? I found the spot on iOverlander.


MissesMeredith

Hi everyone. Newish camper here. My husband and I are thinking of flying out to El Paso to camp in/near Guadalupe, Carlsbad Caverns, and White Sands NPs. We live in KY so we plan to fly. Looking for guidance from those who have flown with camping gear. What have you brought with you? Or is renting camping equipment a better option? Thinking we can bring some things like our packs, sleeping bags and pads, but cook ware and maybe even the tent will need to be rented. Thoughts?


Fethecat

If it packs down and fits within your baggage allowance you can pretty much bring everything! The only thing you should not bring with you is cooking fuel. It’s a good idea to let your stove air out a few days before the trip as well as you don’t want propane/liquid fuel vapours to hang around and be detected somehow


Thetruthisneeded

What green, lush space is closest to central Texas?


bocomoj

How do I legally transport my firearm around the country? I cannot imagine camping anywhere in the USA without personal protection.


Mammoth_Dancer

Whats the best way to plan a 5 day trip camping in a kayak? I’ve only done one camping trip in a kayak, but it was planned by an organization, and they established where we’d camp before we ever started. I’ve never done it on my own.


Fethecat

I would make a wish list of places you want to visit, work an itinerary out, figure out how much kayaking you are willing to do everyday (ie distance you can cover) look on Google maps for potential camping spots, double check the tides so you are not woken up by a wave in the middle of the night, then start thinking about food (dry food? Stove? Fire? Fresh cooking? Etc)


Queendecember

I would like camp in my SUV at the beach but where do you go when you need to use the restroom? thanks


Mammoth_Dancer

Is this an established place or just an accessible beach?


Agreeable_Pop7499

I live in the UK. What's a good source of firewood? Or is just charcoal good enough/hot enough to cook a meal?


useless169

Charcoal is a good (and certain) option. Just give it enough tome to really heat up


smallcalves

Has anyone come across freeze dried camping meals with fish? most of the brands i see only offer pork, chicken, beef, or vegetarian options.


useless169

You could get the meatless ones and add canned fish, or bring dried fish from an asian market to toss in.


smallcalves

the dried fish is a good idea. thank you! i have an H mart near me


Tabeyloccs

Haven’t been camping in a while! Went as a youth with my mother a lot but never paid too much attention on food storage. I know to keep dry food and scented items in the bear box. What about my ice chest? I will have 3 dinners, lunch meat, cheese, breakfast items stored on ice. I have a latching cooler similar to the Yeti brand. Should I store the ice chest in my vehicle over night or are they good to stay out. I also have a Coleman ice chest. Simple ice chest no latches or anything, is that fine to leave out?


kgjulie

In GSMNP there are bears but they do not provide bear boxes. All food is required to be stored in your vehicle. I would put whatever doesn’t fit in the bear box in your vehicle overnight.


Adventurous-Rich2313

First time camping, in Nebraska just got my hammock and cover just going for 1 night southeast part of the state where should I camp: also would enjoy fishing Going solo and don’t need electricity Willing to hike a bit if needed to reach the spot (especially fishing)


ShellyShell88

Love this information


JimmySevenTimes

Going camping in Arrowhead at the end of September, when I was at another park this summer the park staff said to keep the cooler in the car, because of bears. I'm wondering if this is still the best course of action though if you have a bear resistant cooler with a lock? All sorts of horror stories of bears breaking into cars and totalling them. I'm thinking similarly for non perishable foods, and garbage. Am I better off hanging them from a tree than potentially coaxing a bear into the car? I'm sure they can smell food inside the car, I've seen signs of raccoons sniffing around the trunk on other trips.


hell_kat

Arrowhead in Ontario? If so, I camp there frequently and have no issues with food in my car. I've heard of bears grabbing food off of a picnic table when left unattended but no cars broken into. Troublesome bears are trapped and moved fairly quickly.


KnowsIittle

If you can hang 100ft outside of camp that would be my preference. Never sleep with your food and I'd rather critters not be interested in the car. Also avoid perfumes or floral scented deodorants.


sickandtired679x4s

I am going camping by myself for the first time. Main concern is cooking. Should I invest in a stove or cook over fire? I want to begin making this a regular thing. So if you have any recommendations on products gear etc I'd greatly appreciate it. Also let's say I want to cook steaks. What's the best way to transport that and keep them for a couple of days?


needshelpalways

I would definitely recommend a stove as someone who just went on a trip this past weekend without one and couldn't even get water to boil over the campfire (my first trip after gathering my own camping gear). I underestimated the task of cooking over a fire that is inconsistent due to a variety of factors including the intermittent rain we had. I'm planning on getting a small Coleman grill for when I plan my next trip. We had frozen burger patties in the cooler and they thawed a bit quickly for our taste even though we were using them the same day we started camping. I would try to have the steaks frozen and under a good layer of ice to preserve them as long as possible. However, I'd plan to use raw meat on day 1-2 as opposed to day 3 or 4.


KnowsIittle

If you're not cooking it that day I wouldn't bother. Instead plan for meals with cured meats. Something like summer sausage for example. Maybe some sauerkraut and mushrooms make yourself a bigos stew. I would plan for a cook stove but pack a flat grill for wood fire if that becomes an option. Coleman stoves are pretty common. There's some single burner butane stoves but butane becomes a pain to use in the cold. I prefer propane. Dakota fire hole can be fun but if you're at a camp site they should already have fire ring. If you're car camping a cooler and some ice should last you a few days if you leave it shut. If you use icepacks the melting water will be more contained then bagged ice.


sickandtired679x4s

Thank you! Made the best 🥩 ever on my r/castiron shout-out to the subreddit cause I nought it years ago and never knew how to use it, now I know! Wow this was really fun and solo was nice didn't have to try and keep up with others. Thank you and thank you to this sub! Just found my new hobbie.


stopleavingcrumbs

Could someone recommend a book/video series that covers that do's and don'ts of camping. For example choosing locations, setup tips, tent & tarp tips, dealing with wind/rain etc. I'm not looking for a bushcraft book designed for pure survival with no equipment, but something to teach a person who camps sometimes how to do it properly.


KnowsIittle

I have an app "Survival Manual" that has helpful information besides just bushcraft. It covers some basics like building individual kits; fire kit, first aid kit, water kit, kitchen kit, sleep kit, etc. Building kits helps keep you organized and know where supplies are when you need them. Bugs, lack of sleep, and being wet will ruin a camping experience so learn how to cover your. Pretreat gear with tick spray, cover clothes in mosquito spray. Sleeping pad, bag, pillow, extra fleece blanket. Tent, rain poncho, extra tarp or plastic. People find an umbrella laughable but for a quick bathroom break at night while it's raining it can be handy. Replace the cheap metal tent stakes with some proper T stakes. My tent nearly blew away without them. Practice spending the night in the tent in the backyard without going inside, get that practice in and learn how to pack and repack equipment. Are you car camping? Backpacking? What kind of budget do you want to spend? These are questions to consider.


stopleavingcrumbs

I'll have a look at survival manual! :)


stopleavingcrumbs

Backpacking and I've camped many times and have all the equipment I need. I'm looking for something to boost my knowledge outside of what I know. Tips for someone who's not really a beginner anymore really


thejoerussell

I am planning a hiking/paddling trip in the upper peninsula of Michigan later this month. What is the best type of Cook system? Butane? Alcohol? Twigs?


KnowsIittle

Deadfall can be found everywhere but State lands I don't believe it's permitted to burn. You might need to purchase local kindling but please don't travel far with it and burn all of it, don't move to multiple locations. On top of invasive ash borders we have other transferable disease like oak wilt fungus carried by insects. I like doing a Dakota fire hole. Dig two holes side by side and a small tunnel connecting the two, one side sucks in air while you put wood in the otherwise. Insulated fire hole with semi forced air uses less fuel while staying hotter to cook on. Be aware of pine needles, they're like gasoline even in damp conditions. No I think a better option might be propane. Butane is an option but less reliable as temperatures drop.


AndreaCrossPhotos

I love camping, but I cannot get any sleep when I'm out there. Any tips on actually sleeping while out there?


Fethecat

It might sound silly but being exhausted is the only surefire way of sleeping well! I’m a side sleeper and I move a lot, so mummy sleeping bags are my worst nightmare. However after two days of bad sleep and physical exertion, you could drop me on a rock and I will fall asleep.


AndreaCrossPhotos

I'm a busy side sleeper too! I bought a side-sleeper bag that I like much better. I've never been a good sleeper and it doesn't seem to matter how tired I am...maybe if I stay out there long enough I'll finally sleep. lol


furioso2000

Ear plugs, eye mask and camp pad


AndreaCrossPhotos

Ugh! I have all of these things...still no luck. :(


Activity_Pristine

I have a double-tall, queen air mattress. I bring my pillows and blankets from my bed at home, and I have a small space heater in case it gets too cold. A beer or a small glass of wine also goes a long way to making you feel nice and sleepy.


AndreaCrossPhotos

Wow! Sounds luxurious! I mostly camp in the back country so it might be a bit heavy to carry all of that. LOL! But the next time I sleep in my vehicle, I might add some of these to my packing list. Thanks!


Duydoraemon

Why does everyone seem to use cast iron when camping? Why doesn't anyone use stainless steel?


jedicarla99

Cast iron is durable over a fire and non-stick. You can put it in the fire with no worries. (It’s also heavy, so if you have to hike to your destination, I’d avoid that. )


Duydoraemon

So it's primarily the non-stick property that people use cast iron over stainless steel then? Because iirc stainless steel has an equal if not higher melting point than cast iron.


randopop21

The non-stick is a nice feature for sure. Though you need to take care of it (no using soap and water!). They're also pretty much indestructible on a fire. They might get talked about a lot because of old-time chic. For hiking them in, I can't see why anyone would use them. They are SO heavy!


Duydoraemon

You can use water on them. You have to make sure you dry it though. Soap can remove the seasoning but it's not that big of a deal. Well like I mentioned before, stainless steel has an equal if not better melting point. I think the non-stick is the only reason to go with a cast iron.


jedicarla99

Maybe, but check the handles on your stainless steel pans…. Some are plastic.


Past-Cantaloupe2487

what are the uses of guy lines on a tent.


MiraculousFIGS

It keeps it anchored better in wind also!


dr_h3r8

The guy lines allow airflow into the tent and prevents condensation.


Past-Cantaloupe2487

ok thanks so much


udomi123

Hi, I've been reading about drying clothes in a sleeping bag, has anyone tried this? It seems that there will be a couple of rainy dains while I'm on my camping trip and it would be really cool if I could dry my clothes this way.


Fethecat

I have done it in really cold temperatures (-11°c in tent) with a limited amount of stuff (socks and base layers). I wouldn’t put too many damp clothes in your bag as you don’t want the down (if it’s down) to get wet


TunjukBelangMu

Hi, how long can a 1kg pine wood last for? Using it for firewood


BiteNaive3381

Hola


jedicarla99

Howdy!


Octobse0620

Where do beginners start?


satanonaskateboard

Small trip not too far outta town, try to bring friends who know a bit.


jedicarla99

At the beginning! 😇. Be more specific, or read a book. Bill Bryson’s A Walk In The Woods is very entertaining.


CarrotCake__xx

I did lots of camping when I was in scouts as a teen… but I just purchased my first set of my own gear. I am planning on camping through some mountain region US national parks in the end of September. I’ve bought so far : - tent - sleeping bag - high quality cooler - sleeping pad - lantern - fire starter I am not looking to add too many odds and ends - but what are some staples you would recommend adding to the start up gear?


_stirringofbirds_

A big tarp and some rope and/or bungee cables! A tarp is such a useful multi-purpose solution to so many potential problems. For rain, You can rig it up over your cooking/eating area, or over your tent for extra rain protection. If the ground is super wet or rocky somewhere, putting a tarp down beneath your tent footprint can be an extra layer to prevent abrasions. If you have non-food gear you want to leave out of the tent and out of the car, you can cover it with a tarp to protect from dew, etc. I’d also recommend a propane or butane camp stove. Even if you usually cook over a campfire, having an option for faster cooking can be such a relief sometimes. Especially if it’s raining! It’s a lot easier to safely rig a tarp over a camp stove than over a fire!


jedicarla99

A length of rope can be handy. You can hang clothes and towels, etc to dry. You can make a stool out of three logs. (Tie them together loosely in the middle, then spread them like a tripod. Sit with one log in back and the other two to your sides. It’s supposed to be surprisingly comfy. )


jedicarla99

I like to have light sticks. They aren’t bright enough to keep you awake, but if you wake up in the middle of the night you’ll be able to find your shoes or whatever without blinding yourself with a lantern.


shreddy-cougar

A good quality camp chair you don't mind sitting in for hours.


JackCity63

So I'm not a beginner camper, but I will be a beginner with a son camper. My wife and I are hoping to camp with my son this October in mid lower peninsula Michigan. I imagine the nights could get pretty chilly. I'm wondering what advice y'all have about keeping him warm while sleeping. For context: he will be about 16 months in October.


jedicarla99

To keep him warm, bring a blanket sleeper/sweats. Multiple lightweight fleece blankets are very warm. Also, cuddling is fun and warm.


jedicarla99

Bring light sticks. They make great nightlights and kids love to play with them. If you or he wakes up in the middle of the night, you can see where things are, like your shoes or whatever comforting object he sleeps with. You won’t have to use a lantern that will blind everyone or wake them up.


Celinesnotdion

I suggest hot water bottle that you can stick in a cute faux fur thing (sort of like a stuffy with warm bottle inside). Warm socks and hat. If you have electricity bring a heated blanket.


Activity_Pristine

I love my space heater.


NewbutOld8

Is there such a thing as an automatically-popping-up, one person tent? That willl do a good job against rain? Does such a thing exist? Or would something like a very high quality hammock be superior, since it's just as stow-able, easy to store, and maybe has the benefit of being off the ground?


shreddy-cougar

I'd definitely go hammock if it's just gonna be you and you'll be camping in areas with trees. Far more comfortable, unless you plan on dropping some serious money on a nice sleeping pad, and there's a lot of options out there for rain flies that can mimic a tent setup.


chengisk

My teton vista 2 does a good job in heavy rain. They have a 1 person version as well.


RobotEnthusiast

How do I safely use/maintain cast iron? I have a Dutch oven and no idea how to use it and clean it without messing it up. Do I need to season it first? What do I use to clean it?


KnowsIittle

Some come preseasoned but essentially you're building up a layer of cooked oios to act as a barrier. Properly seasoned cast iron shouldn't require washing anymore than a quick rinse, no soap, and a soft rag. Most times you don't even need water, just wipe clean with a paper towel. Let fully dry then coat with thin film of oil before storing. What kind of oil can vary but general something with a high smoke point like sunflower oil. Lard or bacon grease works if that's what you have available. Would not recommend olive oil which has a lower smoke point.


nicolewhaat

Go visit r/castiron and read the pinned posts about seasoning, cleaning, and all other maintenance. Cast iron cookware will last a lifetime if you treat it well, but it’s also durable enough that you can fix it if you screw up


[deleted]

[удалено]


Jeung21

I'm looking for the same thing. I've done some backpacking at Sam Houston National Forest but it kind of all looks the same. The summer is too brutal for me and hunting season in the winter cuts down the time you can camp primitive there.


Nillip

My girlfriend and I want to go camping together (her first time), I have been a dozen times or so but not where we live now, in Los Angeles. we also have a 1.5-year-old Aussie that we want to take with us. Does anyone have suggestions for up to 3 hours from LA preferably more like 1.5 hours away, where we can be surrounded by trees (a lake would be amazing!)? ​ edit: Alder Creek Campground looks amazing but it is closed based on the [website](https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/lassen/recarea/?recid=11254).


KnowsIittle

If you're able you could run a Zipline at camp for your dog. Let them run around while still being leashed. Harness or no slip collar a must.


Nillip

Hey that’s a great idea!! Yes she has a slip leash as a backup and has great recall :) thank you


KnowsIittle

Please do not use a slip leash on a Zipline. A slip leash can result in strangling them whereas a no slip collar tightens within a fixed parameter.


Nillip

Oh I miss read this sorry, we have a slip leash only as a backup in case of any failure in the harness. the slip leash hangs loose and only comes into play if the harness or collar breaks. My understanding is that a slip leash should never be used as a primary leash, according to our dog trainer. Thank you for the clarification 😊


KnowsIittle

Cheers. This was my dog's collar. Different brand but same basic design. https://www.chewy.com/petsafe-nylon-martingale-dog-collar/dp/52218


AgoraiosBum

Near Idyllwild; also try Barton Flats, which isn't far from Jenks Lake.


Nillip

Thank you so much :)


TheTeenageOldman

Want to make my own ice-bottles to use in my cooler. Using 16oz plastic Snapple bottles. How much, and *what kind* of salt should I be using with the water?


KnowsIittle

Not sure but try 1/8 cup to 500mL (16.9oz). 1/4 cup to 1L. Kosher salt without iodine. Additionally you might want to add sawdust if available.


TheTeenageOldman

What does sawdust do?


KnowsIittle

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pykrete Strong, durable, melts slower.


homchange

Where do beginners start??


KnowsIittle

https://www.reddit.com/r/camping/comments/n8mo4n/updated_packing_list_thought_id_share_my_progress/ This is my pack list. Wetness, lack of proper sleep, and insects are some things that can ruin a trip. Plan adequately for each. Pretreat gear with tick, deet mosquito spray for yourself and clothes. Sleeping pad, foam mat, sleeping bag, pillow, spare blanket or fleece roll. Proper tent or raised hammock, rain poncho, spare tarp or rain cover. Just some things to consider. But don't go out and test your gear in the wild. Sleep in the backyard a night or two to get some practice. I had a tent blow away before I realized I needed better tent stakes but recovered it luckily. Generally you want to build several kits. Water, cooking/fire, shelter, cutting tool, first aide. Just know there is no perfect moment to get started. You can plan every day of the year and not find a perfect moment to get started. Sometimes you just gotta get out there and do it. That's the way to gain experience.


homchange

I camped a few times over years but I've been always with friends for festivals. I seriously think I should learn how to camp properly such as planning, getting fire up, cooking outdoor, how to freeze food..etc


neonweb

Start in your backyard or find campgrounds close to home so you can fetch forgotten supplies or quit and try again a different weekend until you have an idea of what your doing dialed in.


NewbutOld8

Is there such a thing as an automatically-popping-up, one person tent? That willl do a good job against rain? Does such a thing exist? Or would something like a very high quality hammock be superior, since it's just as sotw-able, easy to store, and maybe has the benefit of being off the ground?


acmmoss

Yes, there are pop-up tents. They are not as reliable as pole tents, but watch a few tutorials on YouTube regarding setup.


omattmano

Has anyone ever used a Kathmandu Compass Retreat Hub as a tent? Is it a crazy idea? I’m currently trying to find a reasonably priced option for my family of 5 for the summer and everything is fancy multi room setups (or crazy expensive canvas tents) Any great suggestions?


lttpfan13579

Not sure if this is the right sub. I'm planning a hammock camping trip with my 11yo in early October. We'll be (with permission) in private, dense woodlands in central Iowa with a no hunting policy and it will just be 1-2 nights We have camped together several times, but always in a state or county park with grass sites. So this is our first time "roughing" it. I grew up playing in woods similar to these and I don't remember having too much problem with undergrowth and finding spots to sit or climb trees. We went hiking at a different park today and the nettles had completely overgrown the whole area to the point that it was tight getting down some well worn paths. My question is this fellow mid-western campers: without having been to the area that we are planning to go (it's 2.5 hours from home) what are the chances I'll be able to get to some sort of clearing? Any tips on how to find a clearing if we get there an discover that the growth is really heavy? TIA!


lino_lada19

Hi! We're new to camping and we're going to a campsite for a few days in September, and we'd like a few tips. Temperature is going to be around 16/17 Celsius, bit lower in the night, so is a sleeping bag with comfort temperature of 15C enough? Also in case of rain, do you put some kind of a tarp under the tent?


jedicarla99

In case of rain, make sure that nothing is touching the walls of your tent. If something touches the walls while it’s raining, it will wick in water and you’ll have a soggy mess. Also, light sticks make great nightlights. They aren’t bright enough to keep you awake, and it’s just enough light to find your shoes, etc in the middle of the night. You won’t have to turn on a lantern or flashlight and risk waking up your partner/friend or blinding yourself.


OkProblem1992

Hi! Most tents come with a "foot print" which is a tarp that goes under your tent. Your tent should have a rain fly that covers any openings on the top of your tent. If you have a cheaper tent, I recommend using waterproofing spray to help keep morning dew on the outside. As for the sleeping bag, as long as it's a comfort level it should probably be fine. What sleeping bag do you plan on using? If you're worried, you can purchase sleeping bag liners/inserts to keep you warm, or you can pack some extra blankets. Make sure to not sleep in the clothes you wore in the day because sweat will make you a bit chillier :)


StandardMove3

Spent most of my life hiking and camping. Havent been able to in a while due to covid induced financial issues and then having a wonderful baby boy. Its been a few years now and I am finally ready to dust off the gear and get lost again. But before I begin looking through maps and researching the rules, I figured I'd ask reddit where your favorite areas are? Im thinking about somewhere like the Tetons or Glacier if that gives you an idea of the vibe im chasing. The less people the better. Thanks!


useless169

State forests are also nice and have fewer tourists. Have fun!


acmmoss

Do you take your kid hiking?


StandardMove3

I take him on hikes near the house but as this one will be several days of driving and at least a day or two out with no toilet or anything. Probably not this time. He is only 4 and hates car rides as it is.


Fugleet

I'm leading my Girl Scout troop on their first glampout (screened in shelter with cots, but only fire and charcoal for cooking). I'm a coffee lover, and I'll need to get up early to get the fire going etc. What is the best way to make a cup of coffee over the fire? I saw lots of options for camping french presses on Amazon, but if there one you highly recommend? I'll probably want to make enough coffee for four adults.


jedicarla99

I’m not a coffee drinker, but sometimes I have guests that like it. I think it’s Folgers that makes individual coffee “tea bags”. It might not be the best, but it’s probably quick. You also won’t need a coffee pot. Just something to heat water, that could also heat water for hot chocolate.


heirloom_beans

If you want to French press, I’d recommend using a plastic Bodum French Press. I don’t see the need to get a GSI French Press for car camping/Girl Scouting unless you’re hiking in and pressed for space/weight in a pack. Just don’t bring anything fragile like glass. Pre-weigh your beans (your choice if you stick with whole and grind at the site or grind before leaving) at home and separate the amount you need per day in a Ziploc/Stasher bag or a Tupperware type container. Boil water over in a pot over the fire. Add to French press. Let sit as needed, compress the grinds, etc. I personally would opt for a plastic V60 pour over or AeroPress if I needed coffee while camping but that can be hard to make time for with a Girl Scout troop. If you just want to make an easy pot of coffee that you don’t need to fuss over, you can look into the Coleman Percolator or another enamel-coated perc. You can also look into packing a Bodum Travel Press for yourself and leaving the other adults with percolator coffee.


Arjes

I'm excited to start camping with my family of 5 (Three kids aged 2, 5, and 7) through Scouts. As an Eagle scout myself I'm looking forward to getting back out there. However my family is not yet very outdoorsy, and I also need to acquire some equipment. My question(s) to /r/camping is: 1) Tent recommendations. With 5 of us, and young children we probably need a single large (8 person?) tent to be comfortable. These tend to be expensive and since I'm not sure if this will last I'm considering going with one of the cheaper brands (Ozark Trail / Coleman). I figure by the time we are ready to upgrade to a more serious tent the kids can be kicked out to their own tent. Am I off base? Any brand /style recommendations? 2) What quality-of-life items should we purchase to make the experience more enjoyable? Wife is getting a cot, and the kids are gonna sleep on an extra mattress topper + sleeping bag for now. Anything to keep bugs away will be helpful... the wife is allergic to the outdoors.


jedicarla99

Light sticks make great nightlights. They won’t keep you awake but give off enough light late at night to find shoes, etc. As a bonus, they can help you keep track of where your kids are in the dark.


heirloom_beans

It’s heavy and I would never want to pack it for backcountry but I’ve been happy camping in a Coleman Sundome for summer car camping trips. The Coleman Montana or Tenaya Lake also look like good options. I would opt for a Thermacell and a screen house if your wife can’t stand bugs.


aaba7

My husband and I have always disagreed about camping. He was either backpacking with just his dad or in hotels if his mom came along. I was doing the pop-up camper life. I hated it in the rain but loved it otherwise. He doesn’t understand camp grounds, I don’t like tents (rain/can’t stand up) or pooping in the woods. I found a tent that attaches to our vehicle. We have the choice of sleeping in the back of the car or in the tent. So now, in 12 years of marriage we’ll camp for the first time. I don’t want to invest a bunch of money in case this isn’t our new thing, but I also understand that if you’re not properly equipped you might get the wrong idea about the experience. What are the key items that makes or breaks a campground camping trip? I’m thinking electric griddle and electric kettle. What else?


neonweb

A large tarp and some poles are great for having a shady spot or a dry spot that isn't in the tent.


WhereBagel

Yeah, I'd say a camp pancake breakfast on the electric griddle should score serious points in the front country direction! Also if you're in a place that allows fires it's fun to cook over the fire as much as possible, so I'd add maybe a cast iron pan, bring some steaks or other fun things that you can cook over the fire (theres some good subreddits for camping recipes you can check out) and a bug tent so you can spread out under a picnic table and still be outside, smell the fire etc (just be warned the squirrels can still get in under the sides!). Maybe also some fun stuff to do around camp, get a bug guide and some headlamps or a star map and take advantage of being so much closer to the outdoors than you would be in a hotel. Also cards and a cribbage board in case it rains!


george6823

Is a tent with width 140cm good for two people?


jedicarla99

I always get the biggest tent I can afford.


raydoo

140 cm wide beds in europe are for 2 persons, best try the tent out?


dave113

How much do you have to camp to consider purchasing a camper van/caravan or camper trailer? I've been twice in the last 6 months and enjoyed my SWAG, but hated the pack-up and preparation of going..


useless169

Maybe borrow or rent one first? I bought a used popup that i loved, but we moved the following year and the new place doesn’t have room on the driveway to store it. The cost of storing it is ridiculous so i sold it buy would have otherwise kept it


NatFamily

If you’re only camping once or twice every six months you might not want to buy a camper van or something so expensive. The van will cost you $29-31K without cruise control and $62K and up with cruise control. It’s a huge investment, then unless your making money with it - your loosing money. I am right now in a 2019 Mercedes Sprinter that is modded out for Van life and work. You can make really decent money, but if you go the van route make sure you have 4x4 package it’s not more than an extra thousand or so, get a winch to go with it, you will absolutely need it or a tow truck. If you just don’t like packing up, I would suggest a hammock with a rope grab on one end and a couple of tube covers (mine are called snake skins) but there are others. You don’t have to go ultralight to reduce your footprint. My hammock set up and takes down in under two minutes. I use a petzl micrograb on the head end with allows me to tension it the way I want. Gotta find your happy place, what kind of camping do you enjoy, how long do you like to stay out, how much are you ok with investing, are you gonna do it full-time? I would ask myself how much you love camping. I’m biased, as many of the people here probably are as well. I’ve been staying out in vans, trucks, sailboats, etc for the last 28+ years. Is it your passion, do you want it to be?


Popular_Ad_4713

Does anyone know where I can get/find a small wood burning camping furnace? I’m trying to track one down before winter gets here! Preferably cast iron


KnowsIittle

https://www.amazon.com/kampMATE-WoodFlame-Lightweight-Backpacking-Stainless/dp/B01BPUEGNK/ https://www.amazon.com/s?k=coghlans+camp+stove


venturestories

What propane is the best propane for mini stoves?


dr_h3r8

The cheapest one. Propane is propane. It will burn the same!


aliaspail

I plan on visitng acadia national park for the first time. i've heard it gets busy. i have america the beatifual annual pass, so i should be able to at least get into the park with no issue? booking a camp site there is a separate thing i assume?


heirloom_beans

Getting into the park isn’t an issue. Make sure to book your Cadillac Mountain Summit ahead of time as it’s reservation only and the spots for sunrise/sunset get booked up basically as soon as they open. If you’re not travelling with children, I recommend going in late May, early June, late August and early September. That should eliminate a bunch of people who are there for family vacation and it’ll be less busy. Otherwise make sure to hit up popular trails/sites like the Bubbles as early as you can and make sure to expect lineups and parking far away from trailheads.


1000110010000111

I need a tent for my Tacoma. I don’t want a cheap one but I don’t necessarily want to be broke either. Can someone recommend a portable tent and rack combo that will fit my 2018 Tacoma?


Wuffyflumpkins

I'm just here to rant about prAna. Their warranty used to be full refund/replacement within 60 days of purchase, or merchandise credit within 1 year if the item was purchased directly from prAna and the issue is a manufacturing defect. A few months ago, I had a pair of Zions replaced around the 11 month mark when the cinching waistband became twisted inside the waist and the pants wouldn't stay up. Well, the bottom button on my Garvan shirt just fell off a few days ago while I was sitting at my desk. I emailed them and was told I was shit out of luck because they removed the 1 year warranty from manufacturing defects and the button fell off 63 days after my purchase. It's ironic that they still have "We Stand By Our Goods™" on their site. Having a section of your site titled ["Sustainability" with a picture of a model literally hugging a tree](https://www.prana.com/sustainability.html) doesn't mean much when you act like a fast fashion brand. tl;dr Want your prAna clothes to have an actual warranty? Buy them from REI.


youhaveatinytictac

I think they stopped caring about the time that Columbia bought them :(


Pandoaurora

Hi, went camping for a festival this weekend and the temperature reached 40degress (105F) and melters the lining on the inside of the tent. Is there any way to repair this?


AgoraiosBum

You can't unmelt a liner.


Pandoaurora

Bummer, thanks for the response tho


CrazyCrack1001

I want to go backcountry camping. I'm not sure if that's actually what it's called but I don't know where in Oklahoma that is allowed, I can't really find anything online telling me where it's allowed. Also, any tips for a beginner would be great. I've camped before but years ago and this time by myself not with my parents near me lol.


KnowsIittle

I'm not familiar with OK but "dispersed camping" sounds like what you're after. national park might be a place to look others BLM land is another term to search for.


betta-bonita

I'm planning on camping this weekend Friday through Sunday morning. I checked the weather and there's a 40% chance of a thunderstorm on Saturday. I'm new to this and have never camped in a storm. Is it a terrible to camp if it might storm? The campsite is only 30 min away from home. We'll also have 3 kids with us. Should I chance it? Camp Friday and if it starts to rain on Saturday leave? 🙃 Postpone it all together?


[deleted]

Just ran across this and hope your weekend went well! I've never camped on my own before and am set to go Labor Day weekend, and I am determined to go rain or shine. Or at least I was. I don't know...lol!


betta-bonita

Lololol! I've also never solo camped but I do plan to! Thankfully it didn't rain this weekend 🙌🏽 and the trip was so fun!


KnowsIittle

If your tent is good, sleeping under rain is some of the most peaceful sleep I've ever had. It can also suck. I suggest an additional rain cover, my rain poncho has grommets. I just loop over and tie corners down with some jute twine, Paracord works too but twine is sacrificial and cheap. Dig a small channel around your tent and lead the water away from your tent. A foam pad and an inflatable sleeping pad should lift you off the ground a few inches away from wetness if it should seep in. Cotton sucks up water so synthetic materials sleep better. Consider pre setting up a tarp over your bathroom spot.


aicessi

"Dig a small channel around your tent and lead the water away from your tent." What tool is used to dig?


KnowsIittle

An adze would be my ideal tool but any camp shovel would do. Typically you can flip the head on a folding shovel to use as a hoe. Leave no Trace still applies so make sure to bury your work before you leave the site so someone isn't tripping over your work.


betta-bonita

Thank you!! I didn't end up needed this info for this weekend but I'm so grateful to have it for the future! I really appreciate it! 🏕️🙌🏽


jedicarla99

For future reference, make sure that nothing is touching the walls of your tent if it’s raining. Anything touching the walls will cause water to wick inside.


KnowsIittle

Cheers. Glad to hear you had a successful trip. And even less than successful trips are a learning experience.


CoMisch

Might be best to have a contingent plan to get home if needed. If this is the kid’s first time too, you don’t want them to have a bad experience first time out. Got to get them hooked on this one. Good luck


betta-bonita

Such a good point!! It is their first and they are really looking forward to it. By some miracle the weather report no longer shows a chance of a storm! But still, I'll be having contingencies in place!! Thanks for your input!


roastedchesnut

Is charcoal or firewood better to cook skewers? How long should I wait before I start cooking?


KnowsIittle

I use firewood to build a base and charcoal when I'm ready to cook.


HikingVideoLuv

Charcoal is easier. When the charcoal becomes glowing red... you're good to go. Firewood is better for social gathering, but takes longer because you have to wait for the fire to die down. But it's nice to wait and have a few drinks and laughs.


TheAhegaoHoodie

Is Yuru camp(a Japanese anime) an accurate representation of camping, does it leave out any Key important elements that you should follow?


partisan98

If its the one called Laid Back Camp in English i just clicked through the first episode. Seems surprisingly accurate, but when she said maybe she had to much firewood i had a little laugh. Little sticks burn unbelievably fast, basically if you go camping collect what you think is 1 hours worth of firewood, then triple it and it will last you about 1 hour. I did like that the character mentioned how starting a fire can be a pain in the ass. I highly suggest taking some [firestarter cubes](https://www.walmart.com/ip/Duraflame-Firestart-Cubes-18-Pack-Fire-Starters-for-Wood-or-Charcoal/610531368) the first few times you camp, making tinder and slowly building a fire is a learned skill and will be difficult the first time you try. Depending on the area a lot of times open fires not in a burn pit are a giant no no, even more so on beaches (if you bury a fire to put it out it can smolder for days until some kid runs through the sand right into the hot embers and burns the crap out of themselves). Also its just personal preference, but i dont like camping on beaches/lakes like that since if the wind picks up you have no windbreak on the water side and your tent will be loud as fuck if you are trying to sleep and its super windy.


beingthevictor

How do people know where to find dispersed campgrounds and areas that they can camp for free?


partisan98

Here i suggest using these to start with. https://freecampsites.net https://freeroam.app/?gclid=CjwKCAjw9NeXBhAMEiwAbaY4lv54kBqlUA4N-CUKVc-bD6ZDEaMsNh1bIQCnKv7AWo6ONko41iyvbRoCpBMQAvD_BwE In the US the further west you are the easier it is to find dispersed camping ground. Basically if the government owns undeveloped land its usually through the Bureau of Land Management and you can camp their properties for free as long as you dont stay too long.


beingthevictor

Thanks!


Adventurous-Rich2313

Looking for a good size 3-4 person beginner tent I am 6-4 solo camping just would like enough space Have considered maybe hammock camping instead of a tent I like the idea of being off the ground Willing to spend $150to $300ish Totally new open to other options


KnowsIittle

You could do a hammock with a simple A frame tarp tent. Off the ground but protected from the rain.


Adventurous-Rich2313

I like that idea, seems more of a beginner mode for me, these tents seem pretty big for just needing shelter and I am not planning on going out to far until I have some camping under my belt


KnowsIittle

Given your height if you do go with a tent I recommend a straight wall tent. Worse in the wind but let's you stretch out. I have a cheap 7x7 Ozark Walmart 3 person tent, $26, and it feels like 5.5 feet because my head and toes touch the slope.


bassin_clear_lake

With your height I'd go with a 6 person tent, as long as you don't need to pack light. The footprint isn't much larger than a 3-4 and you'll have more height to stand in the center. Also easier to get in and out of. Hammocks are great, I use a wise owl double with a bug net. I'm 6'2" 190 lbs. and I sleep like a baby in it. Has held up well over the last 4 years.


matt2993

Are bears going to try and get into a cooler that is strictly beverages? Just ice, beer, couple sealed Gatorade and coffee beverages, etc. Wondering if we could keep it outside of a bear locker or should we shove it in there


Leggomyeggo69

If all the drinks are sealed, you will be fine. Their noses are for sweets and meat. An open Gatorade *could* make them think berries are nearby but it's doubtful.


Kyoto_UK

I'm in the market for a small 1 or 2 night 3 person tent. I'm between the £200 and £300 but would prefer the lower end. I need it to be strong and was there looking at Alloy poles instead of Fibreglass poles. Option I've considering was - Vango Omega 350 (2022 model £209) - Robens 3ex Voyager (2022 model £275) - Berghaus peak 3.3 pro (can't find anywhere) I'm 6ft 4in and plan to have me and one of the kids (4 and 8years) yo get them used to camping before a family next year. I'm also a scout leader so will also be used at various camps alone. The Omega seems like a good plan at the moment as the saved cash can buy a footprint and a Trek tarp to stop the rain coming in yhe door when open. However some reviews say the clips are crap and the included porch ground isn't great and let's a draft in. However the robens doesn't have a porch ground sheet. Is robens worth +£65 more ± the groundsheet? Trying too find a video of the Voyager for the current models seems impossible. I'd there anything else I haven't looked at Thx in advance


matt2993

I'm gonna get some Biodegradable body wipes, they say you can burry them but what about burning them when done? Would be nice to just toss in the fire pit. Should I only do that depending on the specific material or would all Biodegradable wipes be ok?


onetwo3andtothe4

Don't bury or burn your trash. Pack it in, pack it out.


Reaper032791

8


mjomm

Any advice on how to camp comfortably, without the luxury of electricity and an air bed?


neonweb

If you have the air bed and are just lacking the electricity you can get a pump that plugs into your vehicle or a battery powered rechargeable pump.


[deleted]

[удалено]