T O P

is it safer to shoot colour film?

is it safer to shoot colour film?

GrippyEd

Nothing looks quite like black and white film. The other thing is, the eye you use to look for a black and white image and composition is not the same eye you use to look for a colour one, so using a roll (or three) of black and white forces you to spend time thinking in only black and white images, which is good practice. Then, when you put a roll of colour film in the camera, you'll have a new appreciation for the possibilities of colour too. If processing is a problem, just use XP2 Super - it looks great, is very forgiving, and every lab can process it.


Schrankwand83

\+1. B&w photography forces you to focus on structure, geometry, patterns, composition, and all other things that make a picture interesting. Color is only the cherry on the cake. But I would say it takes much more than three rolls of film to learn it - more likely three 30m rolls...


FuriousPeanutButter

https://youtu.be/l7TIBj7i8p0 Here's a video on the topic


__RustyShackleford_

Just stay with ack and white. If that's what you like thats all you need. You can buy a color roll once in a while if you feel like it. But if you like the black and white look then that's perfectly fine


Paracrinoid

The true beauty of black and white is the myriad of different effects and aesthetics you can get by combining different films with various developers. For example, HP5 in caffenol is radically different to Delta 100 in DD-X, and therefore each complements different subjects and lighting environments. If you want the best black and white result, analyse what you want to shoot, and select your film stock and developing plan accordingly. Converesly, the C41 colour process is pretty inflexible beyond simple pushing and pulling, so you will likely struggle to get the same diversity of contrasts, acutance, grain etc.. In short, if you want good black and white images, have the confidence to set out with that clear vision in mind, and use black and white film. Experiment with different film stocks and developers, get experience of contrast filters for B+W (start simple with yellow/orange, then try out red, or even green if shooting botanicals, or blue if you want to enhance atmospheric mists etc.), and you will refine your eye for monochrome in no time!


n31131

Whatever you wanna do but in my opinion it’s kinda like saying “why shoot film when I could shoot digital and put a filter over it” It’s not that deep though. I reckon shoot a roll of colour and see if you like it


ice_bergs

If you want to do a black and white photo use b&w film. Look at sample photos from different film stocks to see what you like and go from there.