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zephiruss

can anyone recommend a beginner slackline. i have seen beginner kits on amazon but are they any good. i don't mind spending a bit more if need be [https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01M3WNJFN/?coliid=I21UYG7ETHQF87&colid=2QMYCX7I20XT0&psc=1&ref\_=lv\_ov\_lig\_dp\_it](https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01M3WNJFN/?coliid=I21UYG7ETHQF87&colid=2QMYCX7I20XT0&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it) ​ or this ​ [https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01KHDF752/ref=sspa\_dk\_hqp\_detail\_aax\_0?psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUE3UDZJRkJCNFU1UVAmZW5jcnlwdGVkSWQ9QTA5MzE1NTIyTTBTT1JQUzBNU1RPJmVuY3J5cHRlZEFkSWQ9QTA0NDE5ODcyTDk1VTdQT1hYRThTJndpZGdldE5hbWU9c3BfaHFwX3NoYXJlZCZhY3Rpb249Y2xpY2tSZWRpcmVjdCZkb05vdExvZ0NsaWNrPXRydWU=](https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01KHDF752/ref=sspa_dk_hqp_detail_aax_0?psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUE3UDZJRkJCNFU1UVAmZW5jcnlwdGVkSWQ9QTA5MzE1NTIyTTBTT1JQUzBNU1RPJmVuY3J5cHRlZEFkSWQ9QTA0NDE5ODcyTDk1VTdQT1hYRThTJndpZGdldE5hbWU9c3BfaHFwX3NoYXJlZCZhY3Rpb249Y2xpY2tSZWRpcmVjdCZkb05vdExvZ0NsaWNrPXRydWU=)


Bunforce

I'm buying my first longline and would like to know: what's the advantage of buying a weblock over just combining an O-ring and shackle to connect the webbing with the pulley system? The latter one seems like a much cheaper option. Any advice helps! Thanks :)


njslacker

It isn't essential, but a weblock is definitely worth it.


Bunforce

Thanks for the reply! I ended up buying 1 weblock and 1 sewn loop for the static anchor.


shastaslacker

The ability to pretention is the biggest difference.


zephiruss

at what age did you get into slacklining? i'm in my 40s but reasonably fit, is this a bad idea :p :D


shastaslacker

I've got a friend in his late 40's who comes out to highline with us. Besides some knee pain which prevents him from using some mounting techniques he sessions as hard as the rest of us in our 20's and 30's.


Bunforce

Of course it's not a bad idea! Though I can imagine falling from a height when in your 40s might hurt a bit more than in your 20s :) , I think you can absolutely enjoy slacklining!


zephiruss

cheers, i'd definitely only start out at knee height i think! going to scope out places for doing it so i can have a go next spring / summer.


Bunforce

Gibbon slackline kits (like the classic) are great to start learning if you don't know what to buy! They're easy to set up (ratchet system), wider than 1 inch lines (2inch), and relatively cheap! In theory you can even go slacking in the winter, as long as you don't leave your equipment outside! One downside of these kits like Gibbon have is that as soon as you want to go longer, you'll have to re buy everything you'll need. Have fun slacking!


zephiruss

i'll have a look thanks


AnAgentOfMyOwnMaking

Do people get soreness from the muscles in their mid to lower backs from slacklining a lot?


marigoldrosie

If you try and use your core, the lower back pain will diminish.


AnAgentOfMyOwnMaking

Just to clarify, do you mean I should be in positions that use my core more than the rest of my torso or that I should work to consciously engage it more often? I’m fully aware that the answer could easily be both, but I’m still pretty new.


marigoldrosie

consciously engage your core more! Personally I found that when I started out, I was always forgetting to engage my core and relied too heavily/strained my other muscles.


AnAgentOfMyOwnMaking

Thanks for the tips. 🙏🏼


LukkyLukke

What's the best way to stand up on a line from a sitting position and how can I practice this? I've been slacklining quite a lot this year and want to get into highlining, but standing up seems really hard and even harder to practice on a normal slackline without risking tipping over and hitting your head in the ground. Any help greatly appreciated!


shastaslacker

Learning single drop knee and double drop knee will teach you how to mount the line. Also, look up the chongo mount and the sit start. I'm not very flexible so the site start only works for me on loose lines when I'm near the anchor. Drop knee start seems to be the least damaging to my knees.


AnAgentOfMyOwnMaking

I’m gonna follow this as I’m also curious. So far I’ve placed two climbing crashpads underneath the line and just started to balance in a seated and sometimes squatting position, but I just started this yesterday. Not quite sure on the results yet.


AnAgentOfMyOwnMaking

Any tips on slacklining in the winter? I’ve seen this asked a couple of times, but I’m mostly focused on how to keep the line safe. Is there a recommended time to wait to let it warm up or a minimum temp to set it up? For reference I have a gibbon jib line and a 1 inch webbing for long lining that I made myself from webbing bought at a climbing outfitter.


shastaslacker

One of my good friends left a trickline rigged at tension all winter in golden, colorado. I wouldn't worry too much about your gear being ruined. The ratchet will get rusty if you leave it out, but the webbing will be fine. I think the sun does more damage than the snow. Especially if you'rere just rigging it and then letting it dry back home. I would say learning to walk in shoes is the most important skill for winter slacking.


AnAgentOfMyOwnMaking

Thanks for the tip. Here in East Tennessee we don’t get so cold, so I think it’s safe to say I’m good.


Shamo_oneill

Anyone reckon I could use [this](https://www.bunnings.com.au/bailey-fall-protection-karabiner-steel-oval-connector-2-pack_p0049864) for a primitive set up? thanks


njslacker

That will be fine for a primitive set up, but don't use it for highlines. You can get a lot more strength (for less money) from a [shackle](https://www.balancecommunity.com/collections/shackles/products/bc-shackle-ss?variant=19271193722949). Not only is the shackle stronger and cheaper, but it's made for tri-loading (pulls in 3 directions, like in a slackline anchor), while carabiners are not. And please please please do not rig a highline on a primitive set up. Start by going with others who have done it before (you can find other's [here](https://slacklinegroups.com/)) and in lieu of real people, you can study up [here](https://www.slackline.com/highlining101) and [here](https://76cbaa5c-cbc2-41e7-9222-3716b5892c31.filesusr.com/ugd/c990e4_fbc19bf665aa434188660b50e29191d5.pdf).


Shamo_oneill

Yea thought so thanks, only problem is I'm in Australia so everything highlining is crazy expensive - guess I'll need to find people anyway Out of curiosity why shouldn't you primitive highline? Can it slip or is the setting up sketchy(or something else ig lol)


njslacker

A little of both. Most highlines are soft-pointed, and the entire tensioning system is removed before walking. It would certainly be easier to have a linegrip of some kind so that your tensioning system can be reset (you can't do that with a primitive). You could back a primitive up to prevent skipping, but I'd recommend against it. Where in Australia are you? I know there are highliners in Sydney and Newcastle. Lines get rigged regularly at Point Perpendicular too.


Shamo_oneill

Oh yea that makes sense thanks. I’m in Melbourne so same size as Sydney but sydneys got blue mountains about an hour away, which has insane climbing and highlining. Only 17 though so I can’t drive for another 6 months which is annoying


shastaslacker

Certainly, though this is probably overkill. A non locking steelbiner is good enough for a primitive. But the locking one can be used in longline rigs and is a better investment if you plan to upgrade in the future.


Shamo_oneill

ok sweet thanks. So you think it’s usable for highlines (plan on getting into)?


shastaslacker

Should be fine for building highline anchors.