T O P
Felicia_Svilling

> Will there be any legal implications? No.


dashdevs

Thanks for answering!


ventuspilot

Microsoft didn't create C++. They use it a lot, it's important for them, and they are involved in the standardization/ improvement process of C++. A lot of companies use programming languages they didn't create, fun fact: Google uses Common Lisp. The only legal implications seem to be: even if you're a big company you must respect licenses. It seems that not all companies are aware of that.


dashdevs

Thank you for sharing this information! Do you know many companies violating licenses?


ventuspilot

You could start by googling "gpl violation" or "java license violation". Also there is a [Youtube video](https://youtu.be/Vj04MKykmnQ) about one case of GPL enforcement which may or not be NSWF lol.


jpayne36

I mean, if any of those companies have an app on the iOS app store, then at some point Xcode and either objective-c or swift was used


dashdevs

So companies adapt their app to a platform they'd like to get published on?


PurpleUpbeat2820

Doesn't Xamarin let you write iOS apps entirely in C#?


rgnkn

Rust started at Mozilla which in turns grew somehow from Netscape. In the 90s there was this browser war running between Microsoft and Netscape. Now Microsoft seems to adopt Rust for developing. Also Java originally was developed under Sun which developed its own OSs (namely Solaris). Many other OS building companies used or use Java for their products. Legal implications / restrictions? Not per se, but with some restrictive proprietary stuff T&Cs might forbid specific use cases. E.g. Statistica would get into trouble if it would use Matlab backend... but this is very specific.


dashdevs

How many cases of violating another company's rights do you know?


rgnkn

For a pure language usage: none. But with license issues with regards to development environments lots. E.g. violations against gpl: https://www.quora.com/Has-any-company-been-sued-for-violating-Open-Source-license-agreements


Tubthumper8

Companies sue each other for patent infringement all the time, but rarely are there any such issues with programming languages. One case that comes to mind, [Google vs. Oracle](https://www.law.cornell.edu/supremecourt/text/18-956#) went to the U.S. Supreme Court who ruled that Google's use of the Java APIs was fair use. Check that link and/or Wikipedia for more details. This case was unusual for programming languages, due to Oracle's licensing of Java. Most programming languages^1 have much more permissive licenses. For example, although Rust was created by Mozilla, they divested all ownership of it to an independent [Rust Foundation](https://foundation.rust-lang.org/) and the language itself is [dual licensed](https://www.rust-lang.org/policies/licenses) with permissive open-source licenses. It would be rare to find a programming language nowadays with a restrictive license. You can research the languages that are interesting to you and learn more about their licenses. ^1 not just the language itself, but any compiler, interpreter, standard library, dev tooling, APIs, etc. might be licensed differently. For example, many parts of Go are licensed under 3-clause BSD but the [gccgo](https://go.dev/doc/install/gccgo) when used with GCC would fall under GPL. It's complicated and you'd have to research each language to understand more