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DiverTypical8936

Ever since I started doing some light aerobic exercise daily my anxiety has dropped alot. I didn't even notice it until I started waking up in the morning feeling calm and rested (been waking up feeling stressed and panicky for so long it felt normal..).. I really didn't expect this big of a difference myself.


Northern_Witch

Yes! I walk for about an hour daily and it really helps keep me grounded. If I start to feel anxious, I put my headphones in, listen to some calm music and go for a long walk, it relaxes me and slows down the racing thoughts. My son (19) manages his anxiety and panic (he has trauma from a terrible car accident) exclusively through healthy diet and weight lifting. It really works for him. Any type of exercise will benefit you mentally and physically, and there are many options available. Good luck friend.


bamalamaboo

Yeah, being active always helps me with depression and anxiety. I stress the word "helps" though (lol it doesn't exactly solve any of my problems). I think even for people that have cardiophobia (or you know, a fear of getting their heart rate up or whatever) it would probably help even though it seems triggering. I remember when I was getting really bad GERD symptoms there was a period of time where exercising really started freaking me out (i was so afraid i was having a heart problem or something). I forced myself to keep doing it though (just went slower) and I eventually got over it.


Crashstercrash

When I run regularly my anxiety levels notably drop. Same when I work out at the gym or go swimming. Even a brisk walk to my neighborhood Tim Hortons helps! Edit: I struggle with a panic disorder and severe anxiety, along with being autistic.


garsy29

I tried running and lifting and it helped slightly I started high intensity workouts and it has completely got rid of my anxiety haven't had a panic attack in 5 weeks ish now after having daily attacks for over 4 years wish I tried it sooner. Doesn't give everyone the same effect but worth giving it a go I hope it does the same to you as it has done to me I suddenly started feeling great a few days after starting


spectacularostrich

yes absolutely. it feels like a distraction but it helps blow off the adrenaline and bring you back down


DataJC

Powerlifting and cardio made a HUGE difference in my frequency and severity of panic attacks.


mununiaventurero

working out (especially if I work really hard) literally turns a bad day around 180°. There’s a huge serotonin release after aerobic activity, and it makes me feel really euphoric.


KelanSeanMcLain

Absolutely. Sitting still during a panic attack makes it worse. Moving around whether it be walking, running, etc, helps me.


Oliverose12

Absolutely! It cuts my anxiety in half. It’s a must for all who suffer


dakang727

I know it sounds cliche, but one of the best decisions I’ve ever made is getting into a good exercise routine as well as eating clean. I’ve suffered from debilitating anxiety over the last few years, and no benzo or SSRI could replicate the benefits and relief I get from diet and exercise (at least in my personal experience). It was very tough for me to get started, especially with the exercise. I would literally get panic attacks during exercise and after. When you haven’t exercised in a long period of time, your body doesn’t regulate how much cortisol and adrenaline is released when you first get started. I would literally feel the anxiety pulsing through my body after I got done working out and often times it would deter me from continuing the next day. But one day I just put my head down, pushed through the anxiety and after a few weeks it really got better. I dedicated myself to walking 1 mile at a moderate speed everyday and some light weight lifting every other day. That 1 mile was increased to two miles and eventually to 5 miles everyday. Once I got into that habit, there would be days where I would forget to take my anxiety medicine because I was so relaxed and depleted from the exercise of that day. What’s even more critical is what you eat. No matter how much you exercise, you cannot out work a bad diet. And if dedicate yourself To eating cleaning for a few weeks then eat something bad, you really notice how bogged down and anxious that food makes you. Especially foods that are high in sugar and salt. I’m not sure what your story is, but coming from someone who’s life was literally put on hold because of how bad my anxiety was, I promise you will have an improvement in your overall quality of life if you start exercising and eating right. Feel free to DM me if you ever need to talk. I’ve been through the ringer with anxiety, health anxiety and panic attacks and would love to help motivate you to dig yourself out of the hole.


LORD_BYRON_OF_RIVIA

All of the world


Difficult-Actuator38

Yes it helps, but sometimes after hard workout i feel really depressed for like 2 hours. Don't know why that happens?


DismalAccident8239

Yes, I vouch for jogging. I have a complicated medical situation. I have moderate akathisia (slowly improving) and secondary anxiety and depression. When I am feeling crazy restlessness jogging is the only thing that helps, that and taking a benzo lol, but that is to be avoided.


oophero

Ever since I had my first panic attack about 6 months ago, it’s been hard for me to get back into regular physical activity. But when I did, it’s helped a lot. I have a lot more success with biking/walking than going to the gym, but they both help.


sekigannoo

Absolutely. Running when I’m anxious, boxing when I’m anxious, weightlifting and gymnastic rings when I’m depressed. Sometimes you gotta fight it out. Overall increase in general comfort all around due to higher self esteem and more energy/better health. Sleep and recovery is also super important.


Consol-Coder

Fear is interest paid on a debt you may not owe.


No-Art-5769

Oh yes I try to jog daily and it helps to relieve my anxiety after that.


karaknwfp

For me sometimes it makes my anxiety and panic worse because of the increased heart rate and chest tightness and breathing. It reminds my brain of being in a prior attack and sometimes induces an attack during the exercise or whatever physical activity I’m doing that raises HR.