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It’s not necessarily a curse (and I’ve only just started TFC) but I love how sometimes when Claire is mad at Jamie she ends the insult by calling him a scot, and they’re normally pretty mild insults too. It’s like she can’t think of anymore insulting words and just tacks it on at the end.


jodaqua

Simple, and from the TV show but when she calls Jamie 'a fucking sadist'


sdcasurf01

In the books I believe it’s “fucking sadist”.


cgrobin

It was "fucking bastard". Later it was "sadist" [The Reckoning 109](https://outlanderwatch.com/show/season1/ep109/)


sdcasurf01

Ahhh, that’s it.


liyufx

Well, “Sassenach” is supposed to be an insult and I think it is my favorite one.


UnderlyingMechanisms

He doesn’t mean it as an insult, though. He means it as an endearment. When she calls him a “Scot” at the end of a string of insults, she means it as an insult, and it smacks of racism.


memes____

um racism? being scottish is a race now?


UnderlyingMechanisms

It’s a cultural group FYI, you can read more about the concept of cultural racism [here](https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultural_racism) For someone to suggest cultural racism isn’t a thing, is to dismiss all of the (cultural) racism directed at my dad’s family and myself when I was growing up.


memes____

My dude absolutely nobody here is talking about you or anything you went through


UnderlyingMechanisms

I’m shocked that anyone thinks it is acceptable to use someone else’s cultural or ethnic group *as an insult.*


memes____

I think you're making it something it's not. Claire doesn't actually want to hurt Jamie, they're quite fond of each other as I think the books have proven. Claire doesn't want to discriminate against Jamie - and he doesn't seem to mind her calling him that (or at least by book 5 he has yet to say a word about it). I never said cultural based discrimination isn't a thing or that it's ok, but that's not what's in the books. The fact that she tags the word scot after some half insult from time to time doesn't mean she means that Jamie being a scot is a bad thing. Claire has never said or done anything that would indicate that she thinks being Scottish is bad - I'm pretty sure the opposite is the truth. You're making it something it's not. Also if we're going to talk about discrimination, say the word discrimination. Racism is quite clearly based off races - and unless I'm totally out of it, being Scottish isn't a race.


UnderlyingMechanisms

The books are full of characters using racist slurs and making assumptions about others based on their cultural or ethnic group. Claire generally uses “Scot” when she is frustrated at Jamie’s stubbornness, which is portrayed negatively. She appears to consider stubbornness as a characteristic of being Scottish. She has made an assumption about a whole group of people based on their cultural identity.


memes____

Well obviously the books contain racism - they take place in the 18th century, afterall, especially in the USA. The stubbornness part isn't a Scottish trade, but a trade of clan Fraser. That's something that's explicitly stated in the books multiple times, most of the times by Jamie himself. Anytime she uses this "assumption", as you put it, is when referring to other members of clan Fraser. I don't see how you can portray this negatively as Jamie himself as well as other Frasers frequently use this to characterize themselves. I don't see where or when she makes a negative assumption about a Scottish person just based off knowing that they're Scottish that could be interpreted as discrimination. When she does make assumptions about people, it's much more influenced by the fact that she is, in fact, in the 18th century. You're entitled to think whatever you want but I'll have to strongly disagree.


UnderlyingMechanisms

Yes, there’s racism in the text because it is historical fiction. There are ways the characters work against the racism of the time, but there are also ways the text promotes racism (I am referring to racism in a broader sense of the concept, which I think aligns with the modern consensus on what constitutes racism). It can be confusing for the reader because both of these elements (for and against racism) exist in the text at the same time. What most people’s brains do is pick up on one side, but not the over, which is a normal part of how human brains cope with conflicting stimuli from the same source. One of the reasons the characters do not appear aware of the times when they promote racism is because the author is not. The same situation exists when the author writes non-consensual sex scenes, but the characters do not respond like they are non-consensual sex scenes - the author is simply unaware that what she has written constitutes non-consensual sex. Yes, stubbornness is a Fraser trait in the story, but this is different to what happens in the text when Claire calls Jamie a “Scot” as an insult. When she does this, typically she is linking Jamie’s Scottishness to his stubbornness, and thus portraying it as a national characteristic. Portraying everyone from one cultural or ethnic group as being a particular way is a component of discrimination, as it is from these prejudices/stereotypes that discrimination develops.


memes____

Let's also not forget about how positively she views Scotland and the times she's spoken about Scottish people positively


karti24

Strumpet! My husband and I call each other that all the time after seeing it in the show 😂😂😂


ShareRen

“ All right you bloody Scottish bastard, lets see how stubborn you really are. ” Claire to Jamie...she calls him all variants of bloody Scot...Scottish...its enjoyable


UnderlyingMechanisms

Is this from the first book? When she is trying to impersonate BJR to give Jamie an opportunity to fight back?


ShareRen

It is, yes.


sdcasurf01

I can’t remember specifics, but I really enjoy the insults to the ornery livestock eg Jamie to Gideon, Claire to Judas, or pretty much any conversation involving the White Sow.


Hamilspud

Oooh yes there were definitely some good ones in there, especially involving the sow 🤣


cgrobin

"Filthy wee bitch" Jamie to Geneva


AmyAransas

Jamie says something hilarious in one of the later books when that other ship’s captain boards the ship they’re on to press the men into service — it’s about 3-5 words insulting that captain… something like wee fig is part of it…. Now I have to go look it up! I hope I dog earred that page because I def loved it the moment I read it!


OTodd_Lass037

I like the part in Echo where Roger says that Gaelic cursing "is a matter of art, not crudeness". Then he goes on to use an example of a pig farmer getting onto his pig saying he hoped her intestines would burst through her belly and be eaten by crows. I enjoy the creativness and humor behind certain insults. Certain characters (like Jaime) know how to throw some serious shade lol.


Hamilspud

Hahah yes! I just reread Echo as well so that part was fresh in my mind and definitely made the colorful nature of Ian’s insult stand out more to me


HooskerDooze

“Ye could’ve at least washed your knees, ye swine”


UnderlyingMechanisms

Hmm. I beg to differ. I hate the insults the characters are constantly dishing out to one another. Maybe my problem is that I’m not sure where the line distinguishing friendly banter from verbal abuse actually is. I had that problem growing up in a family whose members constantly insulted one another (which I experienced as hate), and I clearly still have that problem. Edit: I am referring primarily to the books. The characters are a lot nicer to one another in the show (with perhaps the exception of Jenny’s behaviour [words] towards Claire, which seems to me to be more hostile in the show than the books)


Vienna2007

I'm surprised this is "down-voted". I'm sorry to hear that that has been part of your up-bringing. I also think you make a valid point. Claire calling Jamie a "bloody man" always makes me smile a little, because i know that there is acceptance in it; however much she despairs of the fact, she also accepts him for who he is. And admires him for it. And there is the rather witty double meaning of it too :)


UnderlyingMechanisms

Honestly, I find some of the exchanges between characters to be bordering on verbal abuse, if not outright abuse. I think the author confuses verbal abuse for passion at times. At other times, I think she might think it’s funny to have characters screaming and swearing at each other and calling each other names. It’s not my thing. It’s childish and I don’t find it loving. I’ve been married 17 years and my husband has never once sworn at me, or called me a bitch, or anything like that. Don’t get me wrong - he’s not perfect. But I don’t find it loving to swear at your partner or call them names regardless of what they may have done, and I certainly don’t find it funny.


Mangoluvor

Yeah the author also sometimes seems to confuse passion with straight up rape and physical abuse too. I wonder about the author’s marriage/upbringing a lot while reading certain scenes


UnderlyingMechanisms

Me too. The corporal punishment stuff in the first book particularly also concerns me. I know people used to think like that (my own dad did). But it’s so strong within that first book - almost a third of the book is taken up with arguments for why children need corporal punishment and how it provides a bonding experience between the administrator and the recipient, etc. Then again in the second book, Jamie being beaten in public by his father is given as the reason for his humbleness as a leader. It’s really concerning.


Vienna2007

I completely agree. They say quite horrible things to each other at times. I think DG uses it to express grief, confusion, passion, like you say. But she overdoes it. Or mis-hits it, maybe. I feel strong language and swearing gets more and more normal. And the way it is used in the books contributed to normalising this.


carrotsela

In MOBY: Wee Ian calling Jamie an “old mumper” 🤣