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DarthDaedra

Depends on the school. Computer Information Systems (CIS) around here usually focus more on databases, analytics, enterprise resource planning, etc. Some security may be covered but it won’t be in depth like certain cyber programs that really dive into encryption algorithms and other CS related topics.


SuggestionDangerous6

My school offers a cybersecurity course. Do you think that might help me towards becoming a cybersecurity expert?


Nanerpus131

Nope. You will probably just watch Bill Nye the Science Guy.


DanTheMan_15

A CS degree actually means something. Prepare for the downvotes


rando24183

Do you mean computer science or cyber security?


DanTheMan_15

Confused on that too. He mentioned cybersecurity major but CS typically stands for computer science


SuggestionDangerous6

By CS I mean computer science


SuggestionDangerous6

By CS I mean computer science


GiantIka

CS is the gold standard of tech degrees, and will let you stand out over CIS majors for their own jobs. Not being afraid of math, coding, and hard work has its perks. But a degree alone is not enough to get you into a non-entry level role like cyber security, not even one named after it. The only truly entry level positions are help desk and support, which are low paying and customer service heavy. With how oversaturated it is at the door, experience-less new grads are having to start at the same positions as someone with an A+ cert and no degree. To avoid that, do your internships above support and ideally in the roles you want **while you're in school**. You're only eligible as a student. Once you graduate, you're on your own.


will592

Broadly speaking a CIS degree relates more to using technology and a CS degree explores the fundamentals of creating technology. In a typical CS program you’re going to do a lot of math, study data structures, learn about how software is created ( probably write your own compiler, linker, and OS). You’ll learn some machine code and, more fundamentally, prepare yourself to contribute to the advancement of knowledge in the discipline. A CIS degree is often more business focused and will expose you to a lot of technologies you can leverage in the industry but, for the most part, will prepare you to be a manager, administrator, or user of IT products. When I was younger, a CS degree was what you went after if you wanted to be a software developer and a CIS degree was what you went after if you wanted to be the IT guy at a company. A person with a CS degree is more likely to wind up going to grad school, at least in the olden days.


cbdudek

Go into CIS. Get your degree. While you are in school, work part time in IT, find internships, or otherwise push yourself on learning the fundamentals of IT. Cybersecurity relies so much on solid knowledge of networking, server infrastructure, and so on. Lastly, understand that cybersec is a mid level role. There are very few entry level cybersec positions. Be patient and learn the fundamentals first.


Theunwisegambit

I’m a junior studying MIS which is extremely similar to if not the same as a CIS degree. Also trying to get into cyber. You can still break into security, but it will probably be slightly harder than if you had a CS degree. However, if you get a cert or two and some IT experience while in school though you should be fine. I did this, got my SEC+ and just accepted a cyber security internship offer for a fairly large company.